Author Topic: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie  (Read 590 times)

Smokey

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The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« on: March 26, 2016, 03:06:14 AM »
I dabbled in cheese making once, It near did my head in.  You really have to hold your mouth right.
So what is the difference between Camembert and Brie?
The ingredients are the same;
Whole milk
Flora Danica starter
Penicillium candidum (white mold)
Rennet
Salt.

The difference is in the way each is made.
In Camembert the milk is brought to 90F , Brie to 86F 
C'bert is ripened for 90 minutes, Brie 15min


It goes on and on with differences of curd setting times, Draining times, Humidity differences and aging temps and times.

The queen of cheese, Brie is probably the most difficult of all chesses to make.  That's why I don't mind paying the ponys to buy store bought.   :)

Bill44

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2016, 03:15:43 AM »
The Brie we prefer is a Tripple Cream Brie, what makes it special I don't know but it is very nice.
The fattest Knight at the round table was Sir Cumference, that came from eating too much pi.

Smokey

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2016, 03:21:52 AM »
They up the cream percentage of the milk for that.
FYI, it takes 7.7 litres of whole milk to make 900g - 1KG of Camembert  :o
That figure is pretty much standard for all chesses.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 03:24:23 AM by Smokey »

chrisg

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2016, 03:25:38 AM »
:)

I had some friends out from England a few years back, they'd always been convinced that nothing could beat French wine and cheese. An afternoon of Clare Valley wine and King Island cheeses and they did not want to leave ;)

We really are rather spoiled :)

Cheers

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Bill44

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2016, 08:23:41 PM »
One major difference between French wine and Aussie wine is that when you open a bottle of Aussie wine you know you are going to be able to drink it. With French wine you don't know if you will be able to drink it until you taste it.
This is due to the fact that as of 5 years ago only 7% of French wine makers were qualified Vignerons, whereas in Australia the figure is up around the 92% mark.
The fattest Knight at the round table was Sir Cumference, that came from eating too much pi.

chrisg

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2016, 08:28:38 PM »
:)

Australian winemakers have been overseeing the vintage at many French vineyards for a great many years. South Australia never did get enough credit for establishing Roseworthy College :)

Cheers
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Snags

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2016, 12:03:49 PM »
Thanks for the info on Brie and Camembert
I like both Brie is mild and Camembert has the boiled cabbage smell which is good too.
I love a washed rind Musnter style that smells like monks feet too.

The major difference between France and Australia is they drink vin ordinaire daily and good wine for special occasions only.
Our cheap wines are pretty bloody good and our standards are higher for them.
Though I have never had a good cheap Rose like in France.
Ours taste too sweet and too thick, theres are thin and refreshing on a hot day, ours taste like cheap white wine with some red mixed in and then they arent cheap either.

chrisg

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2016, 05:09:02 PM »
 :)

A good cheap Rose?

Doesn't really exist - I don't mind Renmano cask for casual quaffing actually but for quality you need to go Portuguese in my opinion.

It's not a style many of our local winemakers have ever embraced, which I do find a bit odd, suits our climate very well :)

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Smokey

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2016, 05:14:05 AM »
Agree about the Portuguese rose,  I think I put a pic of a glass next to a meal somewhere around here.  Nothing like an Australian rose which are exactly as Snags describes, Too heavy and sweet.  I read somewhere that Portugal have a huge selection of grapes to choose from.

chrisg

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2016, 06:50:43 AM »
 :)

Portugal has this massive advantage, it backs onto a high range of fertile mountains so the wine makers just plant different varieties at different heights. I've not been there in a long time but I think you'll probably find grape growing is one of their most significant industries and a LOT of their crop quietly goes over to France.

The result is that they don't get to export a lot of wine themselves, Mateus being the big exception.

I always prefer to buy Australian wine because having grown up in Europe I really do think we make the best wine in the world over-all but rose we don't do much of.

There are exceptions, NZ SSB is just unreal, and affordable, I love Italian wines but they hardly export any - too busy drinking it themselves I suspect ;) Very different taste, sort of earthy, miss not being able to zoom around Europe sometimes :) In theory pilots are not supposed to be using duty free on short hops but customs never take any notice ;)

Cheers
« Last Edit: November 09, 2016, 06:52:46 AM by chrisg »
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Bill44

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2016, 08:16:49 PM »
Agree with you on the Italian wines Chris, great stuff that was easier to get and cheaper 30 years ago.
The fattest Knight at the round table was Sir Cumference, that came from eating too much pi.

chrisg

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2016, 09:13:38 AM »
 :)

Very true Bill, my theory is that for most overseas winemakers exporting to Australia is just ridiculous. I've lived a lot of my life in South Australia, I could drive ten minutes and buy great McLaren Vale wines, a half hour and be in the hills, great wines up there and my lovely sister. Drive say 90 minutes and you can be in either the Barossa or the Claire, but that's just one state, Victoria is rich in wineries, over here in WA the Margaret River is booming, NSW has the Hunter Valley, even Tassie and the NT have growing wine industries.

Hardly any wonder the French made us stop calling our sparkling "Champagne:)"

It's a bit crazy though - our local bottle shop has Mumm on "special" at the moment at $49.95 and were doing a tasting - I went and bought a bottle of plain old Yellowglen for like $7.00 and opened it in front of the Mumm rep and asked her why on earth I would spend another forty odd dollars - she took one sip, don't think she had ever tried what is our staple sparkling, and totally agreed with me, then gave me a bottle of Mumm and took the Yellowglen home :)

My wife did not even like the Mumm much :)

It's ok, but it is not worth fifty bucks a bottle, and as for Moet... created for wankers in my opinion.

I like my Singaporean mate's attitude - despite the fact he COULD happily afford the expensive imported stuff he just drinks Australian Verdello, which actually is an Italian grape variety but long grown here - very nice drop if you are happy with a slightly sweeter wine. From Margaret River especially it is not terribly sweet at all, he is forever getting me to send him cases of the stuff :)

Cheers

« Last Edit: November 21, 2016, 09:16:06 AM by chrisg »
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Cobblerdave

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2016, 10:40:58 AM »
G'day Chris
First came across Verdello over in WA those swan valley were so diferent from those in the east. I championed those verdellos in a couple of navy messes in the day. The Verdello grape is actually Portuguese and comes from the Madeira area.
I'm lucky as there is quite a bit of it avaliable from the Burnett wines here in QLD
Regards dave

chrisg

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Re: The Difference Between Camembert and Brie
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2016, 12:17:29 AM »
G'day Chris
First came across Verdello over in WA those swan valley were so diferent from those in the east. I championed those verdellos in a couple of navy messes in the day. The Verdello grape is actually Portuguese and comes from the Madeira area.
I'm lucky as there is quite a bit of it avaliable from the Burnett wines here in QLD
Regards dave


:)

Interesting Dave, the guys I usually buy from for my mate have always said it is an Italian variety but it gets rather confused in Europe :)

I quite like it as a wine myself, goes well with most foods really but even though the Swan is really not far from me at all, I live near Joondalup, I never seem to get up there much. The Margaret River guys do free home delivery and of late have even been shipping direct to my mate in SA for $5 per case so it's hard to get interested in driving up to see what the Swan has to offer.

He first found a Margaret River one in a bottle shop in Adelaide and has been kinda hooked ever since :)

I'll have to tell him about the Queensland option though - thanks for that. :)

The problem in SA is that because the state produces so many wines from so many regions it can be difficult to find any wine NOT made in the state but a few bottle shop owners do venture over the border sometimes, which is how he came across it :)

Cheers

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